Thinking Back and Looking Forward

I’m writing this after my last day at my previous job. It has me reflecting a lot on the three years I was there. I learned some interesting things and met a lot of great people. There were aspects of the job I really loved, and there were the aspects of the job that I would love to never think about again. I was reflecting back on my accomplishments there and I was surprised how much I had done in some aspects and how little I had done in others.

One of the memories that stuck out to me was the response to some production performance problems we had in July of 2014. I was new to the organization, which made it my first chance to see how it responded to a crisis. I learned a lot about the organization then. It was great to see how disparate teams came together and worked the problem. It also gave me an opportunity to better understand the organizational structure, good and bad. While investigating, I ended up digging into something that wasn’t the cause of  the problem, but demonstrated numerous other little problems that had been festering. There, I managed to make a big impact with different higher-ups once I showed them all of the hidden problems I dug out. It was especially interesting for me to handle from a workplace navigation perspective, since all of the problems were outside of things my team was nominally responsible for.

An area where I tried to make an impact and spent a lot of effort was the build pipeline. The ‘continuous integration’ that was set up by the configuration management team had numerous problems. The basic workflow was that they would – on request or on a timer – take C# code, compile it, and commit the DLLs back to SVN. When I first saw this, I noted that using source control to store the binary artifacts that were created from the repo was odd. The configuration management team didn’t have any interest in changing this, since the entire deployment process was based around deploying DLLs from SVN; it’s understandable they were resistant since changing this piece would require changing everything. This limited a lot of my options on how to change the build pipeline without getting involved in deployment as well. I spent a long time trying to convince the configuration management team to run tests before committing back to SVN, but the server they were building on failed a number of the tests when they tried that. It turned out that the team that owned the code under test didn’t even know those tests existed. This led into an effort to find all of the tests in the whole system and get them passing again. We made progress on these goals but there ended up being a functional area nobody owned, and the rest of my team didn’t feel like we had the capacity to take ownership of it. This left the effort in a sort of stalemate: progress had been made and we could run a lot of tests, but there couldn’t be a clean build unless we started making exceptions. We held in limbo for months, where management continued to debate  who owned that functional area. This eventually led to the effort dying off. That was a massive blow to my morale, since to me it implied a lack of focus on quality; that wasn’t at all their intent, but that doesn’t reduce the frustration after I had gotten so far and made so much progress. I recognize that I may have taken it too personally or read motivation into it on management’s part that wasn’t there, which is an important lesson I’m taking away. I also learned a great deal about how to navigate the corporate environment and how to use soft power to influence change, but most of that was too late to make this change successful; now I know better how to approach this type of major change management from the start.

I don’t want to give the impression that everything was bad – a lot of aspects of the work were great and interesting. I had a great experience working with a system that is much larger than anything I had worked with before. The whole system was hundreds of times larger in terms of computational resources than anything I had worked on before. The codebase itself was approaching ten million lines of code across 10+ different programming languages. Digging into all of this was an amazing adventure to understand how it all went together. Very few people were looking at the system as a whole and I got to come in, learn and understand all of this and help those who were trying to build other pieces of it.

I also had the opportunity while there to mentor some junior engineers and it was quite rewarding. I helped them get up to speed on the code base, which is an easy enough activity. But I also spent a great deal of time working with them on code reviews and helping them understand how to build better software. Helping them to understand the difference between something that works and something that is truly good was really rewarding as they started to see the difference.

My new job is a much different situation than my last job. At the last job I was there to help them clean up the technical mess they knew they had; their issues are common to large organization that have grown through acquisition, and I do appreciate that they wanted to improve. The technical mess wasn’t the whole problem; as you can see from these two anecdotes above there were multiple groups who weren’t in sync and a lack of understanding of each other. The new place is much smaller so it’s unlikely that I’ll have to navigate as many different competing groups, or be assigned such a narrow portfolio. My new company is also much newer so there hasn’t been the time to build up the layers of technical debt. From a technical perspective, at the new job I hope to master a new language and stack and build out some RESTful web services. I’d also like to help build a high performing team and mentor some junior developers, since I found that  really rewarding The person who mentor me to see that difference between “works” and “good” happens to be working at the new place, so that will be a great relationship to renew now that I’ve had an opportunity to play that role. Sometimes the journey is the destination afterall.

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