Book Chat: The Senior Software Engineer

The Senior Software Engineer by David Bryant Copeland is a manual for being a Senior Engineer and covers all of the things nobody bothered to tell you about. For me, it’s all of those things that I put together from reading dozens of blog posts and watching those senior to me do the job. Most of the book was the description of what the role is and describes it in sufficient detail to help an engineer who has not yet achieved the role to target the experience to show they can do the job. It is the sort of description of the role I would have liked to have gotten from a manager early in my career.

Since I’ve been doing the job of a Senior Engineer for years now, most of it wasn’t particularly novel to me. However, I would have liked to read this before I made the transition to Senior Engineer. It differentiates between building a new feature, fixing bugs, and solving problems, which are what I would describe as the three main technical components of being a Senior Engineer. It also describes quality technical writing, working with others, making technical decisions, interviewing job applicants, and leading a team.

Interviewing is probably one of the most critical areas that you don’t get a lot of exposure to before becoming a Senior Engineer, and it’s pretty well covered here. Copeland lists four components to the technical interview (in order):

  1. Informal get-to-know-you conversation
  2. Homework assignment
  3. Technical phone screen
  4. Pair Program

It seems like the phone screen should go before the homework assignment, especially if the assignment won’t be the focus  during the phone screen. I actually interviewed at a place where the author was working some years ago and the interview was significantly different than what he described. There was no informal conversation, no homework assignment, and no pair programming. There was a phone screen and a white boarding session. I suppose he may not have had total control of the process there but it is interesting to see the difference between the ideal and the actualized.

If you are looking to become a Senior Engineer and get a grasp of all of the aspects of the job before trying it, this would be a good read for you. If you are a Senior Engineer I’d pass and try something else. It might also be good read if you are a manager and looking to find a way to articulate some of these ideas to your junior team members.

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