Modern Agile

I heard some references to Modern Agile and went to investigate further. To me, it’s just a reimagining of values espoused in the Agile Manifesto in a response to how the original manifesto was misused. The four values of the modern agile movement are:

  • Make People Awesome
    • The “people”: here is those making, using, or otherwise impacted by software
  • Make Safety a Prerequisite
    • Mostly psychological safety, but includes physical safety too if that is a concern
  • Experiment and Learn Rapidly
    • Try to find ways to do whatever they do better
  • Deliver Value Continuously
    • This, to me, means the technical practices around continuous delivery. But could mean other things outside of the web application space.
    • This is also breaking work into smaller individually valuable pieces.

At first I wasn’t that enthusiastic about the idea, and it seemed to be splintering the agile community. Then I started thinking about the recent resignations at the Scrum Alliance, and consider that maybe the community was already splintering and this is just people writing down what had already happened. The people for whom orthodox scrum is agile had already disregarded “individuals and interactions over process and tools.” Both LeSS and SAFe give up on “responding to change over following a plan” to varying degrees.  

The “focus on people” is, to me, the only right way to build systems and products, but the diffusion of who you are supposed to be making “awesome” makes this focus less impactful. If you were trying to empower the makers to do awesome you would do things differently than a single-minded focus on the customer, and some of those things are mutually exclusive. Modern agile examples of focus on the customer from Amazon and Apple come with horror stories on the engineering side of the late nights and insane demands – can you really make all the parties named “awesome” at the same time?.

“Safety as a prerequisite” is the opposing force to the focus on the customer and the negatives it can cause. This can be protecting work-life balance and everything else that makes people able to engage with the work. Another aspect of this safety is an openness to discuss problems in a candid way. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen the sort of openness to admitting problems that this is designed to inspire. I’ve been places where small mistakes were admitted to openly, but it’s unclear what would happen with larger mistakes since as far as I know none happened while I was there. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the sort of transparency from above which would make this level of openness either which makes it difficult to reciprocate.

I think experimentation is the key insight of modern agile. The original manifesto implied that if external stimuli did not change, the team did not need to try to change. This implication resulted in a challenge-response feedback loop and sought a steady state where if things around you didn’t change much you didn’t change. Even then there are a lot of organizations where the right thing to do is whatever is specified by the scrum guide and anything else is wrong. This experimentation adds an additional focus on continuously trying to find a way to do better regardless of how well you are already doing.

I see “delivering value continuously” as a continuation of working software over comprehensive documentation. Working software, from the agile manifesto, is the expression of what is most valuable,” so you could say it described this concept in a narrower sense. The focus on “value” rather than “software” is helpful since sometimes software isn’t the right solution – for instance, if you have an internal API that works but nobody uses because they are having trouble with the API, activities other than writing more software would be more valuable.

If we as practitioners wanted to stop and reconsider how we go about doing work, this seems like a good place to start that conversation. I would have liked to have seen it as a more open discussion rather than appearing fully formed from the head of a consultancy. These ideas seem reasonable, but it’s not clear what the next step is in taking up this mantle. I would always try to be on a team that was doing all of these things, but I don’t know if this alone is enough to make a team that I want to work on.

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2 comments

  1. Tom Gilb · November 23

    About time to focus on value!

    Like

  2. Pingback: 2016 Year in Review | Chaotic Good Programming

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