Book Chat:The Mikado Method

The Mikado Method describes a way to discover how to accomplish a particular refactoring. The method itself asks that you first attempt to do what you want “naively” and identifying the problems with that approach. Then you roll the code base back to the original state in order to tackle one of those problems and iterate on the process until you can begin to resolve the problems in a bottom-up fashion, resulting in multiple small refactorings rather than one big one. This strategy means you can merge or push with the master branch more frequently since the codebase is regularly in a working state. This avoids the rabbit hole of making changes and more changes and never being sure how close you are to having compiling software with a passing test suite again.

The actual description of the technique and examples is only about 60 pages of the roughly 200 pages of the book; most of the rest is other tips and tricks for working on refactoring. There is also a rather long appendix on technical debt that I found expressed some ideas I had been thinking about recently; it describes four techniques for tackling the sources of technical debt.

The four techniques listed are absolve, resolve, solve, and dissolve. Absolve is essentially normalizing the practice and saying it is okay to do things this way. This would be something like lowering the automated test coverage necessary during a hard scheduled push. Resolve is reverting a change in the current processes and environments that had unintended negative effects. This would be something like getting rid of an internal bug bounty if it was being abused. Solving is changing the incentive schemes in order to put groups into alignment. For instance, having development teams on call in order to help align their incentives with the operations teams. Dissolving is the sort of radical solution that completely removes the friction between groups and makes the problem disappear completely. To continue with the previous example this would be a sort of devops culture where operations and developers are all on the same team and there is less distinction between the two. Each of these techniques could be applied to various means that create technical debt, or even to other sorts of problems.

The actual Mikado technique doesn’t seem book-worthy in the sense that it isn’t complex enough to warrant an entire book on it’s own. The other refactoring techniques weren’t anything particularly novel to people who are already familiar with Refactoring Legacy Code or other similar material. Overall it was a quick read and enjoyable but not the sort of thing I would be recommending to others strongly.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s