Service Creation Overhead

At work we started spinning up a new service and concerns were expressed by some interested parties about the overhead required to get a new service into production. Among the specific concerns that were articulated: it needed to have a repo made, CI builds set up, be configured for the various environments, be creating databases in those environments, etc. Having not deployed a new service at this job I’m not sure if the concerns are overblown or not.

We’ve got a platform set up to help speed the creation of new microservices. The platform can help spin up CI jobs and simplify environment configuration. Creating the repo should be a couple of clicks to create it and assign the right permissions then set up the hook for the CI process. I’m optimistic that this process should make it easy, but only two people on the team were part of spinning up a new service the last time the team did it, and neither of them was involved in much of dealing with this infrastructure.

The project all of this is for needs to be put together and running in production in the next month, so the overhead can’t take up much of the actual schedule. The first version of the service isn’t complicated at all and can probably be cranked out in a week or so of heads-down work. It needs a little bit of front-end work but has been descoped as far as possible to make the timelines easy. We’ve got a couple of code generators to help bootstrap a lot of the infrastructure of the service; we’ve even got a custom yeoman generator to help bootstrap the UI code.

I’m curious if the concerns were memories of spinning up new services in the world that predates a lot of the platform infrastructure we have today or if it’s a reasonable understanding in the complexity of doing all of this. But it raises the question of how much overhead you should have for spinning up a new service. As little as possible seems reasonable, but the amount of effort to automate this setup relative to how often you create new services makes that not as reasonable as it first appears. I think it needs to be easy enough that you create a new service when it makes logical sense in the architecture and the overhead of doing so isn’t considered in the equation.

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