The Systems of Software Engineering

This idea came together from two different sources. First, I’ve been reading The Fifth Discipline about the creation of learning organizations. One of the elements of becoming a learning organization is Systems Thinking, which I had heard of before and seems like a great idea. Then I went to a local meetup about applying Systems Thinking to software development. We ran through a series of systems diagrams from Scaling Lean & Agile Development. These diagrams helped us to both understand Systems Thinking by analyzing a domain we were already familiar with in a structured way where we were presented the nodes of the system diagram and asked to draw connections between them.

There were several different groups each looking at the same sets of nodes and drawing different conclusions for some of the relationships. There were a few very adamant people who all felt that an increase of incentives for the developers would increase the velocity of the team, which was interesting to see since they were mostly scrum masters or software development managers with many years of experience doing the management of software projects and should have seen how that does work out. If the impact of an incentive plan on a team is significantly uncertain, it makes me curious about the sorts of teams these other leaders are running.

Through the entire process we had interesting conversations about how various aspects of the software process were related. Everyone agreed that the interaction of a strong mentoring process on the overall system would decrease the number of low skills developers on the team. There was a discussion of whether it would also directly impact the velocity of the team. Some people were adamant that it would lower velocity since the mentoring time was time that people weren’t working on building features. It’s a reasonable consideration, but it doesn’t seem to match with my specific experiences with mentoring. If you were actively spending enough time to lower your velocity significantly on mentoring activities you would be forcing the mentoring relationship instead of letting it happen organically.

The experience made me wonder if we could construct a system diagram that describes some of the other dysfunctions of many organizations. The diagram we built described (1) dysfunctions around hiring large numbers of low skill developers, (2) using certain kinds of financial incentives, and (3) the push for delivering features above all else. It didn’t describe why a lot of organizations end up in siloed configurations, “not invented here” behavior on technical systems, or lots of the other dysfunctions in multiple organizations. I made the below diagram with the intent of describing  the situation about siloed organizations but without any real experience in this sort of analysis I’m not sure if I’m doing it well.

I made another simple diagram about the causes of “not invented here.”

It feels to me like these diagrams describe the dysfunctions that are common in software organizations. Expanding these diagrams to try and find the leverage points in the system might yield some greater insights into the problems. In spending some time thinking about both of the diagrams I’m not sure what other nodes should be there to further describe the problems.

I’m going to definitely do some more reading on Systems Thinking and try to expand on the thoughts behind these diagrams. If you’ve got more experience with System Thinking I’d love to hear some feedback on these charts.

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