Service Creation Overhead Followup

I previously mentioned the new service we were spinning up and the discussion of the overhead therein. Having finished getting the initial version of the service out into production, I feel like I have some answers now. The overhead wasn’t that bad, but could have been lower.

The repo was easy as expected. The tool for setting up the CI jobs was quite helpful, although we didn’t know about a lot of the configuration options available to us. We initially configured with the options we were familiar with, but found ourselves going back  to make a couple of tweaks to the initial configuration. The code generators worked out great and saved a ton of time to get started.

The environment configuration didn’t work out as well as expected. The idea was that the new service would pick up defaults for essentially all of its needed configuration, which would reduce the time we would need to spend figuring it out ourselves. This worked out reasonably well in the development environment. In the integration environment we ran into some problems because the default configuration was missing some required elements. This resulted in us not having any port mappings set up so nothing could talk to our container. We burned a couple of hours on sorting out this problem. But when we went to the preproduction environment we again found its port mapping settings were different from the lower environments and needed to be setup differently. Here we ended up burning even more time since the service isn’t exposed externally and we needed to figure out how to troubleshoot the problem differently.

In the end I still think spinning up the new services on this short timeframe was the right thing to do – we would have had to learn this stuff eventually when building a new service. Doing it all on the tight timeline was unfortunate but the idea of getting the services factored right is the best thing.

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