Agile Architecture

I’ve been involved in a set of architecture discussions recently and it had me thinking about the role of architecture in an agile development team. The specific discussion mostly was around which services owned what data and which services were confederates using that data. My team owned all of the services in question and felt that the data should be centralized and the edge pieces should query the central store. There were some other interested parties that felt that the data should be distributed across the edge pieces which would coordinate amongst themselves and had a central proxy for outside services to query through. Both options had some pros and had some cons.

I had proposed some changes to the initial centralization plan to account for some issues raised by the other parties. Then something unexpected happened – they said that’s great but you need to do it our way anyway. This had me stunned at first. This didn’t change the way that they would use the resulting system so why was it their decision to make? Sure, they had higher titles but that isn’t a license to make architectural decisions universally. I hadn’t been in a situation like this before and wasn’t quite sure what to do with it to convince everyone involved that my proposal was the best option for the organization as a whole..

Fortunately the exchange was over email so I took a while to regroup and collect some opinions about what to do. I asked a few different people and got a couple of specific pieces of advice. First, that I should set a meeting with the all of the sets of stakeholders, so they would remember that there were more people involved. Second, that I should prep a full written description of the various options in advance. The goal of setting a meeting was to get a concentrated block of attention from the other parties rather than a series of ad hoc email exchanges. The written description  was to make it clear what the full state was, rather than just a series of deltas from the original plan. That would make it clearer what was going on. Bringing together all of the stakeholders meant that those opposed to it for reasonable but team-specific reasons would see the other stakeholders and hopefully see their perspective.

All of this went down over two sprints where we had set aside time to sort out this architecture for our next big project. Defining these tasks was tricky; the first sprint had tickets to handle figuring out all of the requirements and speccing several different options. The requirements weren’t put together by product since this was not an end user-facing feature. The second sprint was to gain consensus on the various options, which brings us back to the anecdote above.

The two points came together and once we had their concentrated attention and the complete description of the plan they came around to our centralization plan, with modifications.

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