Both Project Management and Coaching?

This is somewhat outside of the normal material I write about, but this idea came to mind and I wanted to take an opportunity to explore it further. The context of this thought was that a mentoring program is being launched at work. Why is a manager both responsible for guiding the day-to-day execution of a project and for development of staff beneath them?
The goals of the project and the goals of personnel development are often at odds. Any specific experience a person needs or wants to get is likely something they don’t have much (if any) experience with yet, which means they won’t be as efficient or as good at that particular skill. While management taking care of your people gains you flexibility and goodwill in the long term, it has short term costs.
The product owner is separated from the scrum master, separating the “what” from the “how” in order to prevent a conflict of interest. Similarly, splitting the staff development aspect from the technical management of the project seems like it could prevent a similar conflict of interest about an individual. Maybe a stronger explicit mentorship program would handle mitigate this conflict of interest, but unless you give out a mentor who is both capable of and interested in working on staff development it wouldn’t help much. I have seen an explicit mentorship program where serving as a mentor was informally required for promotion to higher level, which resulted in people becoming mentors explicitly to check the box for their own personal benefit.
By setting up part of management to be incentivized to do staff development and achieve technical excellence, rather than completing projects or shipping features, you can create an environment that allows those closest to the system under development to do their best without the pressure to achieve explicit results. This reminds me of the idea of slack in queueing theory, where putting less work into the system means more work will come out. Once you build up staff appropriately and get everyone cross-trained, the overall outcome becomes better. Think of it as an optimization problem where you may have achieved a local maximum; getting to a higher peak would be better but the cost of valley between the peaks needs to be paid.
You could theoretically have the manager of the developers on a team be involved with the work of a different team, but it would be hard to see what those developers needed in order to help develop them in the longer term. Spending all day with a group of other developers working on the technical problems you face doesn’t really give you the insights necessary to see what a completely separate group of developers is struggling with. If you look at a problem with a new perspective, you can easily see different solutions, you could also miss important details about the problem itself and backtrack to already tread territory.
Maybe this is just my perspective based on the places I’ve worked, where the scrum master has been more of a process leader and impediment resolver than technical coach or project management. In my experience, development managers have spent a large portion of time working with the product owner to help factor stories in a more completable fashion and to derive the technical requirements from the business requirements. It always felt like the development manager spent more of their time working on those urgent but not really important things, and ignoring the important but delayable things because they were hard.
To answer the original question “Why is a manager both responsible for guiding the day-to-day execution of a project and for development of staff beneath them?” it seems to be because splitting up the responsibility differently won’t give management the day-to-day visibility into how to effectively provide useful developmental guidance. The ability to coach people on how to perform their role better requires that you spend enough time seeing them perform the role, so you can’t really be engaged in other technical activities on a day-to-day basis. Even if they had the insight to do so, it is exceedingly hard to measure staff development, which would make it hard to create goals and metrics around the activity. If you’ve had a different experience with how these roles have been broken down post a comment.

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