Hackathon

At work we recently held a hackathon where everyone who was interested in participating had 24 hours to build whatever they thought would be interesting and useful. We had 21 teams across 4 offices with ~60 participants total. I had never done a hackathon before and this seemed interesting so I registered for it without a particular idea in mind. As the start rolled around I was planning to put together a tool to simplify how we were generating configurations for containers in marathon. However, at the kickoff pizza dinner I heard another developer saying he had a plan to solve our issues concerning the lack of available conference rooms. Every afternoon there would be an hour or two where there were no meeting rooms left available, and while we’ve got more space coming it will be a while until it is available. Having been a victim of this problem before I asked if they could use another hand on their team and was graciously invited onboard.

The key insight they had was to use the logs from the wireless network to figure out who was in what office each day. Once we had an idea of who was in what office that day we could cross reference that with their calendar appointments and see what rooms were booked and didn’t need to be. There was some concern about false positives, i.e.,  we didn’t want to have the system saying that you weren’t in the office by 10 so release your room at 11 while you were stuck in traffic. So we built a hipchat integration to check with you about it.

The three of us started Thursday night at about 6 with a general divide and conquer along the three major components: data mining/parsing, calendar matching and decision, and the hipchat integration. I mostly worked on the hipchat portion. Since the bot had to reach out to specific people on it’s own volition as opposed to responding to people or messaging a fixed channel, our needs were different than what most of the prebuilt hipchat integrations are doing. I ended up doing an XMPP integration using Smack. The biggest challenge in getting this working in the context of a web service was that I needed to keep the connection to hipchat open longer than the API implied it needed to be. I found this out when my initial attempt to send a message and then close the connection failed because the message didn’t finish going through but we had closed the connection on our end. After spending several hours working through that I called it a night at about 1:30 a.m. and headed home to catch some sleep.

Getting back the next morning at about 7:30, in my office there was one lone developer who had been there working on his project all night. He had been working on porting a feature from the web app to the android app, because when he used the app he wanted that feature. I spent the first part of the morning working on getting the response from hipchat hooked up and found another interesting problem. I wasn’t able to respond to myself as the bot for whatever reason. So if the bot was using my credentials to send messages it wouldn’t see my response to it. I suspect it was because hipchat was being clever and not sending the message as a message but some sort of history, but I never was able to confirm. At 8:30 the dev who had been working on the matching stuff for our project got in and started processing live data for that day; our app immediately started spitting out rooms we thought didn’t need to be booked. I went and did a little scouting at about 10:30 to confirm the situation and matching seemed right.

We ran into a credentials snag on getting an account with the rights to unreserve other people’s meetings. So we didn’t have a full demo but the example meetings we had identified painted a pretty picture of how well it could work and the number of rooms it could free up.

When demo time rolled around we all got together to show off what we built. There was a bunch of interesting stuff put together. There was a set of living visualizations of service dependencies built by parsing urls from the system configuration data. There was a port of one of our mobile apps to Apple Watch. There were two different teams that built Alexa integrations for different portions of our products. Several teams built features for various mobile apps. One team set up a version of Netflix’s Chaos Monkey in the load test environment, including a hacked Amazon Dash button that would kill a server in that environment at the push of a button. Another team built a deploy football in the vein of the nuclear football complete with keys and switches and a little screen to display progress. Two tech writers twisted arms and got someone to build a hipchat integration to look up acronyms from a glossary they had put together on the wiki.

Overall I had a blast but ended up pretty exhausted from the ordeal. Some prizes will be given out on Monday. I’m not sure of the exact criteria for them but I wasn’t competing at all – I was enjoying the latitude to do what I thought was best. There will be one more prize given out at the company-wide all hands wherein everyone gets to vote on as the most impactful project after we get a chance to see how everything  turns out in real usage.

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