Being a Wizard

A somewhat obscure question got asked in a chat channel at work that I knew the answer to, which helped out some other engineer. The question wasn’t anything that abnormal – it was about a weird error message coming from an internal library. Searching through the library’s code wasn’t immediately helpful since the unique part of the error message didn’t appear in the code. The reason I knew the answer wasn’t because it was easy, but because I had spent an hour investigating it the day before.

Sometimes when you see someone have an apparently impressive insight, that doesn’t necessarily mean they are better than you, they may just have had an experience which makes the answer obvious to them. This applies to all sorts of other technical activities. During the Hackathon I did a similar thing. One of the other devs on the team was integrating the portion of the code I was working on and having trouble. It was immediately obvious to me why, because I had put in the time earlier to figure it out the hard way. Your mind is a powerful pattern matching system. It immediately recognizes this:

 

happycatOr thisftc

 

If you think back to when you first started learning calculus, the terminology and symbols of it were complicated and foreign, but after a while you gained a certain familiarity with them and after a while they became second nature.

You may go to work and make some business web app in one particular technology stack, but there are all sorts of concepts that go with it that aren’t the business or the tech stack. You’re synthesizing things like design patterns, test driven development, RESTful web services, algorithms, or just the HTTP stack and everything that goes with that. These are all the transferable skills that can help you “cast a spell” and jump past a problem.

When I sat down to learn Scala, it wasn’t that big a task since most of the language features had equivalents I was familiar with in other languages. That let me skip forward to the nuances of those implementations and the few language features I was less familiar with. Getting experience with those ideas in the abstract let me appear as a wizard going forward since I jumped ahead on the learning curve and look the wizard. Some of the common feelings of impostor syndrome are the worry to be found out like another wizard.

wizard_behind_the_curtain

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