Continuation Passing Style

I have been doing some work with a library that creates guards around various web endpoints. They have different kinds of authentication and authorization rules, but are all written in a continuation passing style. The idea of the continuation passing style is that you give some construct a function to ‘continue’ execution with once it does something. If you’ve ever written an event handler, that was a continuation. The usages all look somewhat like

secureActionAsync(parseAs[ModelType]) { (userInfo, model) => user code goes here }

There was some discussion around whether we wanted to do it like that or with a more traditional control flow like

secureActionAsync(parseAs[ModelType]) match {
    case Allowed(userInfo, model) => user code goes here then common post action code
    case Unallowed => common error handling code
}

The obvious issue with the second code sample is the need to call the error handling code and post action code by hand. This creates an opportunity to fail to do so or to do so incorrectly. The extra routine calls also distract from the specific user code that is the point of the method.  

There were some additional concerns about the testability and debuggability of the code in the continuation passing style. The debugging side does have some complexity but it isn’t any more difficult to work through than a normal map call which is already common in the codebase. The testability aspect is somewhat more complex though. The method can be overwritten with a version that always calls the action, but it still needs to do the common post action code. The common post action code may or may not need to be mocked. If it doesn’t need to be mocked this solution works great. If the post action code needs to be mocked then putting together a method that will set up the mocks can simplify that issue.

This usage of a continuation helps collect the cross cutting concern and keeps it all on one place. You could wrap up this concern other ways, notably with something like like AspectJ. The issue with doing it with something like AspectJ is that it is much less accessible than the continuation passing style. AspectJ for this problem is like using a bazooka on a fly, it can solve it but the level of complexity introduced isn’t worth it.

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