Session Fun

I’ve been working on getting a new session infrastructure set up for the web application I’m working on. We ended up going with a stateful session stored in mongoDB along with some endpoints to query the session with. This design has a couple of nice aspects – all of the logic about if a session is active or not can live inside of one specific service and a session can be terminated if needed.

Building a session infrastructure is a fairly common activity, but we are building a session that is used by multiple services and we can’t roll all of them out simultaneously. So we’ve been building a setup that can process both the new session and the old session as a way to have a backwards compatible intermediate step. This is creating some interesting flow issues. There are two specific issues I wanted to discuss: (1) how to maintain the activity of the new session during backwards compatibility and (2) processing of identity federation.

Maintaining the new session from applications that have not been updated is nuanced. Since, by rule, you haven’t made changes to the applications that haven’t been updated, you can’t add any calls. In our case there was a call made from all of the application frontends to a specific service, so we are using that to piggyback keeping the session alive. We looked into a couple of other options but didn’t find anything easy. We considered rolling out a heartbeat to the various application frontends but that would require an extra round of updates, testing, and deploys for code that was likely to all be ripped out when we were done.

The federation flow is extra complex because a federation in the new scheme is not that different from some of the session passing semantics under the old session scheme. This ends up mixing together the case where there is just a federation occurring and the case where the new session has timed out and the old session is still valid. This creates an awkward compromise; you’d like to be able to say that if the new session has timed out the entire session is expired, but if you can’t tell the difference between the two cases that’s not possible. This means that the new session expiration can’t be any longer than the old session expiration. But it also solved the problem with maintaining the new session while in applications that haven’t been updated yet.

The one problem solved the other problem which was a nice little win.

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