Book Chat: Growing Object-Oriented Software Guided By Tests

Growing Object-Oriented Software Guided By Tests is an early text on TDD. Since it was published in 2010, the code samples are fairly dated, but the essence of TDD is there to be expressed. So, you need to look past some of the specific listings since their choice of libraries (JUnit, jMock, and something called Window Licker I had never heard of) seem to have fallen out of favor. Instead, focus on the listings where they show all of the steps and how their code evolved through building out each individual item. It’s sort of as if you are engaged in pair programming with the book, in that you see the thought process and those intermediate steps that would never show up in a commit history, sort of like this old post on refactoring but with the code intermixed.

This would have been mind blowing stuff to me in 2010, however the march of time seems to have moved three of the five parts of the book into ‘correct but commonly known’ territory. The last two parts cover what people are still having trouble with when doing TDD.

Part 4 of the book really spoke to me. It is an anti-pattern listing describing ways they had seen TDD go off the rails and options for how to try to deal with each of those issues. Some of the anti-patterns were architectural like singletons, some were specific technical ideas like patterns for making test data, and some were more social in terms of how to write the tests to make the more readable or create better failure messages.

Part 5 covers some advanced topics like how to write tests for threads or asynchronous code. I haven’t had a chance to try the strategies they are showing but they do look better than the ways I had coped with these problems in the past. There is also an awesome appendix on how to write a hamcrest matcher which when I’ve had to do it in the past was more difficult to to do the first time than it would look.

Overall if you are doing TDD and are running into issues, checking out part 4 of this book could easily help you immediately. Reading parts 1 through 3 is still a great introduction to the topic if you aren’t already familiar. I didn’t have a good recommendation book on TDD before and while this isn’t amazing in all respects I would recommend it to someone looking to get started with the ideas.

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