Book Chat: The Pragmatic Programmer

For a long time this had been on my list of books to buy and read with a “note to self” saying to check if there was a copy of it somewhere on my bookshelf before buying one. It felt like a book I had read at some point years ago, but that I didn’t really remember anymore. Even the woodworking plane on the cover felt familiar. It felt like it was full of ideas about creating software that you love when you encounter them but are disappointingly sparse in practice. Despite being from the year 2000 it still contains a wealth of great advice on the craft of creating software.

Since it is about the craft of software, not any specific technologies or tools or styles, it aged much better than other books. That timeless quality makes the book like a great piece of hardwood furniture, it may wear a little but it develops that patina that says these are the ideas that really matter. There is an entire chapter devoted to mastering the basic tools of the trade: your editors and debuggers, as well as the suite of command line tools available to help deal with basic automation tasks. While we’ve developed a number of specialized tools to do a lot of these tasks it is valuable to remember than you don’t need to break out a really big tool to accomplish a small but valuable task.

It’s all about the fundamentals, and mastering these sorts of skills will transfer across domains and technical stacks. It was popular enough that is spawned an entire series of books – The Pragmatic Bookshelf – and while I have only written about one of them I have read a few more and they’ve all been informative.

About two-thirds of the way through the book I realized that I had indeed read it before – I had borrowed a copy of it from a coworker at my second job. He had recommended it to me as a source he had learned a lot from. I remember having enjoyed it a lot but not really appreciating the timeless quality. Probably since that would have been around 2007, it wouldn’t have seemed as old, especially since things seemed to be moving less quickly then. Maybe I just feel that way since I didn’t know enough of the old stuff to see it changing.

If you haven’t read it, go do it.

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