Book Chat: Functional Programming in Scala

I had been meaning to get a copy of this for a while, then I saw one of the authors, Rúnar Bjarnason, at NEScala 2017 giving a talk on adjunctions. Before seeing this talk I had been trying to wrap my head around a lot of the Category Theory underpinning functional programming, and I thought I had been making progress. Seeing the talk made me recognize two facts. First, there was a long way for me togo. Second, there were a lot of other people who also only sort of got it and were all there working at understanding the material. At the associated unconference he gave a second talk which was much more accessible than the linked one. Sadly there is no recording, but I started to really feel like I got it. Talking with some of the other attendees at the conference they all talked about Functional Programming in Scala in an awe inspiring tone about how it helped them really get functional programming, and the associated category theory.

The book is accessible to someone with minimal background in this, so I came in a somewhat overqualified for the first part but settled in nicely for the remaining three parts. It’s not a textbook, but it does come with a variety of exercises and an associated repo with stubs for the questions and answers to the exercises. There is also a companion pdf with chapter notes and hints about how to approach some of the exercises that can help you get moving in the right direction if stuck.

Doing all of the exercises while reading the book is time consuming. Sometimes I would go read about a half a page and do the associated exercises and spend more than an hour at it. The entire exercise was mentally stimulating regardless of the time I committed to the exercise, but it was draining. Some of the exercises were even converted to have a web-based format that is more like unit testing at Scala Exercises.

I made sure I finished the book before going back to NEScala this year. Rúnar was there again, and gave more or less the same category theory talk as the year before, but this time around I got most of what was going on in the first half of the talk. In fact, I was so pleased with myself, that I missed a key point in the middle when I realized how much of the talk I was successfully following. I ended up talking with one of the organizers who indicated he encouraged Runar to give this same talk every year since it is so helpful to get everyone an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of why all this works.

This book finally got me to understand the underlying ideas of how this works as I built the infrastructure for principled functional programming. It leaned into the complexity and worked through it whereas other books (like Functional Programming in Java) tried to avoid the complexity and focus on the what not the why. This was the single best thing I did to learn this information.

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