Type Aliases in Scala

I had an interesting conversation recently with one of the junior engineers on my team about when to use type aliases. Normally when I get asked for advice I’ve thought about the topic or at least have a rule of thumb I use for myself. Here all I could manage to express was that I don’t use type aliases but not for any particular reason. I felt I should do better than that and promised to get some better advice and see what we can do with that.

Having thought it through a little, here’s the guidance I gave. You can use type aliases to do type refinement to constrain an existing type. So, you could constrain that integer to only positive integers. Instead of assuming that some arbitrary integer is positive, or checking it in multiple places you can push that check to the edge of your logic. This gives you better compile time checks that your logic is correct and that error conditions have been handled.

They can also be used to attach a name to a complex type. So instead of having an

Either[List[Error], Validated[BusinessObject]]

being repeated through the codebase you can name it something more constructive to the case. This also allows hiding some of the complexities of a given type. So if, for example, you had a function that returns multiply nested functions itself like

String => (Int, Boolean) => Foo[T] => Boolean

it can wrap all that up into a meaningful name.

None of this is really a good rule for a beginner but it feels like it wraps up the two major use cases that I was able to find. I ended up going back to the engineer that prompted the question, with “use type aliases when it makes things clearer and is used consistently.” Neither of us were really happy with that idea. There are clearly more use cases that make sense but we weren’t able to articulate them. We’re both going to try it in some code and come back around to the discussion later and see where that gets us.

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