Book Chat: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good

Haskell was the white whale of functional programming in my mind, something that is the definitive form of functional programming but with such a steep learning curve that it put off all but the most determined students. I had been recommended Learn You a Haskell for Great Good a while ago but kept putting it off because of the intimidating nature of the material. I eventually had a big block of time where I was going to be home and didn’t have many responsibilities so I figured this would be a great opportunity to take a crack at it.

I sat down with it with an expectation that it would be mentally taxing like Functional Programming in Scala was, however having put in the work already reading that and Scala with Cats I was way ahead of the curve. While the Haskell syntax isn’t exactly friendly to beginners I understood most of the concepts; type classes, monads, monoids, comprehensions, recursion, higher order functions, etc. My overall expectation of the difficulty of the language was unfounded. Conceptually it works cleanly, however, coming from a C style language background the syntax is off putting. Added to the basic syntax issues most of the operators being used do give it an aura of inscrutability, especially being difficult to search as they are. I did find this PDF that named most of them which helped me look for additional resources about some of them.

The book explained some of the oddities around some of the stranger pieces of Haskell I had seen before. Specifically the monad type class not also being applicatives, it’s a historical quirk that monads were introduced first and they didn’t want to break backwards compatibility. The other fact that I had not fully appreciated Haskell dates from 1990 which excuses a lot of the decisions about things like function names with letters elided for brevity.

The other differentiating fact about the book is that it tries to bring some humor, rather than being a strictly dry treatment of the material. The humor made me feel a stronger connection with the author and material. A stupid pun as a section header worked for me and provided a little bit of mental break that helped me keep my overall focus while reading it.

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