Book Chat: Extreme Programming Explained

Extreme programming (XP) is an alternative software development methodology that would be described as an agile methodology. It’s a competitor to scrum, but more focused on the developer experience, less prescriptive of specific organizational practices, and more prescriptive of technical practices. I was familiar with the concepts of XP and recently picked up the second edition of Extreme Programming Explained. This new edition refined some of the technical practices about deployment since tools now exist for even more rapid deployment than what was initially conceived.

The build time practice is interesting, the idea being that a continuous integration build/test cycle should take ten minutes. While you could make the build faster than 10 minutes, keeping it a bit longer generates a decent mental break to allow someone to get a cup of coffee or get up and stretch. Whereas, if it’s slower than that, there is a tendency to move onto a different task and you can lose context on the old task and the new task. It matches with my experience; although I hadn’t been able to articulate the solution, I had seen the problem.

The overall methodology seems solid, however it doesn’t market itself to the whole business the way scrum does which seems to have impacted the adoption of the methodology as a whole. The practices suggested are all pretty straight forward:

  • colocate the team,
  • construct a team with all necessary skills on the team,
  • have visible progress locators,
  • work when you can really concentrate on it,
  • pair program,
  • user stories,
  • a weekly cycle,
  • a larger quarterly cycle,
  • slack,
  • the above build time practice,
  • continuous integration,
  • test first programming, and
  • incremental design.

Most modern software teams would be in favor of most, if not all, of these practices. Some of the practices are outside the control of the team and would need significant management support, but most are things the team can control.

I don’t think that the differences between this and other agile project management methodologies are that significant. The biggest difference with scrum I can see would be that scrum has fixed reflection periods whereas XP has continuous reflection with impromptu kaizen events. I think that this difference between XP and scrum would allow you to differentiate yourself from all of the scrum implementations that are out there but never finished. I don’t think that the book adds much to my understanding of software engineering, however it’s an excellent selection of software engineering practices. If you’re looking for a different perspective on agile methodologies this would be an interesting read.

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