Book Chat: Securing DevOps

Securing DevOps is an introduction to modern software security practices. It both suffers and succeeds from being technology- and tool- agnostic. By not picking any particular technology stack it will remain relevant for a long time, however it is not a complete solution for anyone since it gives you classes of tools to find but not a complete package for software security. If you need to start a software security program from zero this lays out a framework to get started with.

While I’ve only been doing software security full time for a few months now, I feel like the identification of the practices to engage isn’t the hard part, it’s the specifics of the implementation where I feel I want additional guidance. I know I should be doing static analysis of the code as part of my CI pipeline, but I don’t know how to handle false positives in the pipeline or what is worth failing a build because of. I don’t know what sort of custom rules I should be implementing in the scanner for my technology stack.

The book did go further into detail on the subject of setting up a logging pipeline. It describes how to set up rules to look for logins from abnormal geographic locations and how to look for abnormal query strings. The described logging platform is nothing abnormal for a midsized web application, however, I don’t know if you could have a small organization and have this level of infrastructure setup. Hooking up the ELK stack, while open source, is not easy, and the kibana portion requires a fair bit of customization and time to get everything together and working.

It feels as though we are missing a higher level of abstraction for dealing with these concerns. Perhaps, the idea that most software applications should have to go through this level of effort to get ‘standard’ security setup for a web application is reasonable. Even on the commercial tools side there seems to be a lack of complete solutions. Security information and event management (SIEM) tools try to provide this, but they each still require significant setup to get your logs in and teach the program how to interpret them. It feels like some of this could be accomplished by building more value in a web application firewall (WAF). WAFs were not fully endorsed by the book due to the author having had a bad experience with a bad configuration problem. Personally, I think a WAF seems necessary to protect against distributed denial of service style attacks.

Overall the book is an introductory to intermediate text, not the advanced practices I was looking for. If you’re bootstrapping an application security program this seems like a reasonable place to get started. If you’re trying to find new tactics for your established program, then you’ll probably be disappointed.

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