OWASP Dependency Check

The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) provides a number of tools and resources to help create more secure web applications. Their dependency check tool is designed to integrate into the build step of your application and tell you if any of your downstream dependencies have known security issues. The idea is a simple but powerful one – when your application is being built it pulls in a number of libraries and those libraries pull in even more transitive dependencies. You need to look at all of them and cross-reference the National Vulnerability Database to see if any of them have known issues. While you may know to keep an eye out for announcements of security findings from libraries you use directly, but you may not easily know the transitive dependencies your system expects. It’s like a more traditional vulnerability scanner, but rather than pointing it at existing servers to find those that are vulnerable, you put it into the build pipeline to find those you are about to make vulnerable.

The tool has integrations for a number of different popular build systems for the JVM and .NET. It also has experimental support for Ruby, Python, C++, and Node. This predates the github vulnerability scanner but works in a similar way. Since I’m working with Scala day to day using SBT as my build system it isn’t supported by github. I’ve been using an SBT plugin to start integrating it into build systems in various services and libraries. The report generated provides both the severity of the vulnerability and the likelihood that it matched the vulnerability to the binary. So far the likelihood has always been correct in determining whether the binary matches the one indicated to be vulnerable, but I’m still not confident in that since most of my repos were using similar dependency sets and thus generating similar reports.

Taking an afternoon to setup the scanner, run it against a variety of repos you work with, and look through the findings seems highly worthwhile. If you’ve been keeping up with your library upgrades you likely won’t find anything earth shattering. But if you have a dependency that isn’t keeping up to date then you might be in for an interesting surprise.

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