Book Chat: Manage It!

Manage It! is an overview of modern project management techniques. Most of it was accessible to me as a person who has never formally run a project, but has been involved in many. The less accessible material was concentrated towards the end which I dutifully worked through thinking there might be more immediately relevant portions after. It heartily embraced three different practices: strong meeting facilitation, rolling wave planning, and avoiding schedule games.

The meeting facilitation advice started out fairly straightforward – have an agenda, stick to the topic at hand, and hold one-on-ones with the team. It then goes on to discuss some more radical advice, like don’t go to meetings that aren’t about solving problems, question why you had the meeting if it ends and nobody has any action items, and avoid serial status meetings. If your project has a problem, getting the relevant people into a room and coming out with a solution is a great way to break the impasse. Other sorts of meetings can impact the progress of a project, but to me that doesn’t make them immediately a bad idea. From the perspective of the project manager I can see that other sorts of long-term work or out of band activity can impact the potential of the project, but it seems necessary for the functioning of a healthy engineering organization. I agree that the lack of action items coming out of a meeting seems like a warning sign it wasn’t a good usage of time. If a decision was made generally one or more people would leave the room and do something because of it. Serial status meetings are more complex; if you are holding a meeting where people tell you about progress being made on initiatives where the others in the room aren’t involved or impacted, it may be a good use of your time but it’s a bad use of everyone else’s time. If you are being invited to meetings to provide status, the book advises to send status via email and skip the meeting, the idea being that if the organization doesn’t accept that behavior then it isn’t the place you should be. Daily standups are not impacted from this practice because they’re about the impediments, not just the status. Overall it seems like a good package of advice as to how to interact with meetings.

Rolling wave planning is an implementation of the idea that your plan will fail, but that the exercise of planning is valuable regardless. Your short term plan should be pretty solid but the further out, the more vague the plan gets. So, you don’t worry as much about the long term, and as you acquire more information you update the plan. This works both for changes from outside the project and things you learn from executing the project itself. The one experience I have had with explicit rolling wave planning did not go well, but I feel that was because we were trying to keep the near-term solid plan too far into the future and engaging in some devotion to the schedule.

The schedule games section was the part that felt the most real to me, it listed out 16 ways a project plan can go awry and ways to cope with each of them. I felt like I had seen the vast majority of the pitfalls out in the wild. This previous visibility involved me more in the rest of the material since I felt the authenticity of this compared to a lot of books which don’t give practical guidance on  how to get from poor practices to good ones. The section on “schedule chicken” felt particularly familiar to me after having been involved in a high stakes version many years ago. We even made progress in getting out of the situation using one of the techniques described.

I would recommend this book to someone who has already led a team or project for a little bit and is interested in doing more of it. If you’ve been doing that sort of work as your primary role it probably still has some bits of interest. If you haven’t run a team or project yet you may get something from it but I feel that for a lot of the information you need to have seen the problems in action some before you can appreciate the importance of  avoiding it.

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