Self Credential Stuffing

Credential stuffing is an attack where you take previously breached username/password combinations and reuse them against other sites with the hope that the user had an account there and that they used the same credentials. This is why users are recommended not to reuse the same password for multiple sites. On the application side, defensive options are generally varieties of MFA, but that is a significant burden to the user of your average web application. You can react to the attack by rate-limiting logins from the same IP and blacklisting IPs that attempt too many logins. This is a reactive approach to someone attempting to break into the system. Reactive defensive positions are great, but proactive ones are even better.

Discussing this with some coworkers over lunch we came to the idea of getting the credentials and doing it to ourselves. Find the users who had credentials breached and proactively prompt them to change their passwords. This was an interesting theory over lunch but turning it into a practice ran into some difficulties. The first was the legal status of the breached credentials. Could we pull these off the internet and use them to do something? Have I been Pwned? supplies lists of only passwords hashed in different ways, which are still in a dubious legal state. Even if you get past the legal barrier involved, how would you react to an email telling you that your password has been compromised even if it wasn’t the people sending the email who lost your password? It doesn’t seem like it would be a positive reaction. Forcing a password reset on the next login could work assuming the user was going to log in again soon, but for our particular use case we can’t make this assumptions.

This seems like a weakness to the entire username/password scheme of protection. Things like password managers exist to help cover part of the problem. A password manager requires the user to take a more active part in their own security. There has been ongoing discussions with replacing passwords with biometric identifiers or hardware devices like Yubikey. Yubikey and the like might be ready to augment security but don’t have general adoption yet. The opt-in nature of these measures means that they’re more likely to be adopted by those who are already not sharing passwords among sites. The self credential stuffing could be used to provide additional knowledge and security measures to those who are less aware of the problems or even just figure out how exposed your user base is to the problem. However, it doesn’t really seem to secure the application better, it might help the ecosystem as the whole.

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