Book Chat: The Psychology of Computer Programming

The Psychology of Computer Programming by Gerald Weinberg is describing the how and why of computer programming in the abstract. It covers topics like when and where to leave comments, how the choice of programming language influences the eventual program written, or how to go about hiring programmers. I read the silver anniversary edition which added some annotations about how events had changed between the original 1971 release and 1997 when the silver anniversary edition was written.

The book starts out with talking about reading programs with some example code written in PL/1. The example reads fine even if you know nothing about PL/1, it goes through several variants of the same program, dissecting the pros and cons of each implementation. While modern programming has mostly eschewed limits on memory usage and program size, similar pros and cons could be applied to things like GC pressure or context switching.

Each chapter closes with a series of introspective questions about the topic for programmers and  managers , mainly about how it could be applied to your day to day activities. After a chapter on programming as a social activity it asks the manager, “In setting your own working goals, what part is set by what is passed down from above and what part is set by what comes up from below? Are you satisfied with this arrangement, or would you like to alter it in some ways?” Whereas it asks the programmer “What part do you play in setting the goals of your team? What part would you like to play? What part would you like others to play?” These two sets of questions sort of suggest a  conversation between perspectives and helped me to understand the perspective of management better.

The section on time sharing systems vs batch systems did not age well since neither system is used anymore. It was still interesting to see a breakdown of the pros and cons of the two systems and how it impacts the culture of the workplace. It provided a case study of a company where they switched from a batch system to a time sharing system, which resulted in a breakdown of the informal communication system between the developers. Under the batch system they would congregate around the result return since when the results would be back wasn’t certain. Once they switched to a time sharing system everyone spent time in their office and there was little communication and teamwork among the programmers.

There was no single takeaway from this book where I would recommend that you should read this to achieve a particular end. Overall it was an interesting read from a conceptual perspective, but I don’t think it’s applicable to the average programmer. There is more value I think on the management side, but since that isn’t what I do it’s harder for me to judge.

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Book Chat: Programming in Scala

I had previously mentioned Programming in Scala when discussing Scala for the Impatient, saying that Scala for the Impatient was written as a reaction to the ~800 page bulk of Programming in Scala for people who wanted just enough to get started with. After having read Programming in Scala it feels like criticism of its length is fair. The first half of the book was massive overkill for people who had experience in any C derived language or any other sort of object oriented language. There were sections that were marked off as optional reading  if you were familiar with Java because the behavior being described was similar. In comparison, the second half of the book was a wonderful experience even for an experienced programmer, since there were in depth explanations of all of the advanced language features.

Some of the things I learned were simple. For instance, that regular expressions can be used as extractors, which is a straightforward idea. Or, that predef is implicitly imported everywhere. Or that the arrow operator is actually defined as an implicit conversion in predef and not an explicit part of the language.

Other sections were more complex. The rules for how for expressions get mapped into other syntax were similar to what I had figured out, but the rule about how conditionals and assignments within the expression are evaluated added a lot of clarity to what I had learned by doing. I learned the ways you can use type bounds to improve variance indicators. The authors also discussed the transform method on futures that will be available in Scala 2.12, which has me excited to get to that upgrade.

There were some other things covered that even after a considerable study I’m not sure I understand. I understand the syntax for refinement types but I don’t think I understand the value even after the provided in-depth example using currencies. There was also an in-depth discussion of how the designers arrived at CanBuildFrom in the collections package. CanBuildFrom enables extraction of common operations from many collections but returns a collection of that same type and not some supertype. It makes sense in an abstract sense, but I don’t think I could implement a similar pattern without copying it directly out of the book.

Despite the book’s heft, there were a couple of topic I would have liked to know more about. I was hoping for a discussion of the reflection capabilities provided by manifests, type tags, and class tags, but since they are just library pieces and not integral to the language they weren’t covered. There were some oblique references to how bytecode gets generated from various Scala structures, but I was hoping for more insight into how to make interfaces that are less susceptible to breaking changes under the hood even when the Scala side looks fine.

Overall it’s a good read and not as long to read as you would think a book this size would be. It’s easily divided up into small sections so you can easily sit down and read a page or two and make progress over time.

Book Chat: How To Solve It

How To Solve It isn’t a programming book. It’s not exactly a math book either, but you will find yourself doing geometry while reading it. It isn’t a book on logic, but it is all about structured thought processes. I would describe it as a manual to teaching a systematic approach to problem solving to others, using geometry and a series of examples. It tries to lay out all of the thoughts that whiz through your head when you see a problem and understand how to solve it without really contemplating how you knew it. It’s a fast read, assuming that you know the geometry he uses in the examples.

The problem solving process is broken into four basic steps: understanding the problem, devising a plan, carrying out the plan, and looking back. At first it seems obvious, but that’s thing about a structured approach, you need to cover everything and be exhaustive about it. For example, to understand the problem you identify the unknown, identify the data, identify what you want to accomplish, try to draw a picture, introduce suitable notation, and figure out how to determine success. If you wanted to know should you buy milk at the store this sort of formal process is overkill, but if you are struggling with a more complex problem like trying to figure out what’s causing a memory leak or setting up a cache invalidation strategy it might be valuable to structure your thoughts.

I haven’t had a chance to apply it to a real problem yet. I did use some of the teaching suggestions – how to guide the pupil to solve their own problems – with one of the junior engineers I mentor and it seemed productive. I got him to answer his own question, however not enough time has passed to see if it improves his problem solving abilities in the future.

Overall the book was an interesting experience to read and seems practically applicable to the real world.

Seven More Languages in Seven Weeks

Seven More Languages in Seven Weeks is a continuation of the idea started in Seven Languages in Seven Weeks that by looking at other languages you can expand your understanding of concepts in software engineering. While you may never write production code in any of these languages, looking at the ideas that are available may influence the way you think about problems and provide better idioms for solving them.

This installment brings chapters on Lua, Factor, Elixir, Elm, Julia, MiniKanren, and Idris. Each of these languages is out on the forefront of some part of software engineering. Lua is a scripting language with excellent syntax for expressing data as code. Factor is a stack-based programming language with interesting function composition capabilities. Elixir is Ruby-like syntax on the Erlang VM. Elm is reactive functional programming targeting javascript as an output language. Julia is technical computing with a more user friendly atmosphere, and good parallelism primitives. MiniKanren is a logic programming language and constraint solver built on top of Clojure. Idris is a Haskell descendent bringing in the power of dependent types to provide provably correct functional code.

Overall it was an interesting survey of the variety of programming languages. Some I had done a bit with before (Lua, Elixir) some I had heard of before (Elm, Julia, and Idris) and some I hadn’t even heard of (Factor and MiniKanren). Each chapter was broken into three ‘days’ indicating a logical chunk of the book to tackle at once. Each day ends with a series of exercises to help make sure you understand what’s being presented.

Since these languages are out on the edge of the world in programming terms, they are evolving fairly quickly. This ended up biting the Elm example code particularly hard since large portions of it have been deprecated in the releases since then and they didn’t work on the current runtime. Compared to the lineup from the original book (Clojure, Haskell, Io, Prolog, Scala, Erlang, and Ruby) you’ve got a much broader variety of languages in the sequel, but nothing with the popularity of Ruby or the legacy install base of Erlang. Since this was written in 2014, none of these have had a massive breakout in terms of popularity and adoption, however they do seem to do well in terms of languages people want to work with.

Overall it’s an interesting take on where things could be going.  I don’t think most of the languages covered have significant mainstream appeal right now. Two of these languages seem to be more ready for the primetime than the others. Julia definitely has a niche where it could be successful. I feel like the environment is ripe for something like Elm to surge in popularity since frontend technology seems to be going through constant revisions.

Book Chat: Pair Programming Illuminated

My team has been doing more pair programming recently so I picked up a copy of Pair Programming Illuminated. I had never done a significant amount of pair programming before and while I felt I understood the basics, I was hoping to ramp up on some of the nuances of the practice.

It covers why you should be pair programming, convincing management that you should be able to pair program, the physical environment for local pairing, and common social constructs around different kinds of pairs. All of this is useful information, to varying degrees. Since the book was written in 2003, some of the specifics of the physical environment section didn’t age well – advising the use of 17” monitors most obviously. Both of the evangelizing sections seemed to cover the same ground, and did not seem to be written in a way to try and convince someone who is not already open to the concept. Neither section seemed to be written to the person who isn’t already in favor of doing pair programming. There were lots of references to studies, and some personal anecdotes, but none of it stuck in a way that felt like it would change someone’s mind.

The social aspects were interesting, however most of the section was stuff that felt obvious. If you have two introverts working together then they need to work differently than if you have two extroverts working together. A lot of the time the tips were common sense, and didn’t seem like it was necessary to write it down in the book. I would have liked to see more discussion of getting someone to vocalize more and clearly what they’re thinking about.

I feel like I’m better equipped to do pair programming because of having read this, but I also feel like a long blog post would have been just as good a resource and much more focused. I don’t know what else I would have wanted to fill out the rest of the book.

Book Chat: The Pragmatic Programmer

For a long time this had been on my list of books to buy and read with a “note to self” saying to check if there was a copy of it somewhere on my bookshelf before buying one. It felt like a book I had read at some point years ago, but that I didn’t really remember anymore. Even the woodworking plane on the cover felt familiar. It felt like it was full of ideas about creating software that you love when you encounter them but are disappointingly sparse in practice. Despite being from the year 2000 it still contains a wealth of great advice on the craft of creating software.

Since it is about the craft of software, not any specific technologies or tools or styles, it aged much better than other books. That timeless quality makes the book like a great piece of hardwood furniture, it may wear a little but it develops that patina that says these are the ideas that really matter. There is an entire chapter devoted to mastering the basic tools of the trade: your editors and debuggers, as well as the suite of command line tools available to help deal with basic automation tasks. While we’ve developed a number of specialized tools to do a lot of these tasks it is valuable to remember than you don’t need to break out a really big tool to accomplish a small but valuable task.

It’s all about the fundamentals, and mastering these sorts of skills will transfer across domains and technical stacks. It was popular enough that is spawned an entire series of books – The Pragmatic Bookshelf – and while I have only written about one of them I have read a few more and they’ve all been informative.

About two-thirds of the way through the book I realized that I had indeed read it before – I had borrowed a copy of it from a coworker at my second job. He had recommended it to me as a source he had learned a lot from. I remember having enjoyed it a lot but not really appreciating the timeless quality. Probably since that would have been around 2007, it wouldn’t have seemed as old, especially since things seemed to be moving less quickly then. Maybe I just feel that way since I didn’t know enough of the old stuff to see it changing.

If you haven’t read it, go do it.

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Book Chat: Growing Object-Oriented Software Guided By Tests

Growing Object-Oriented Software Guided By Tests is an early text on TDD. Since it was published in 2010, the code samples are fairly dated, but the essence of TDD is there to be expressed. So, you need to look past some of the specific listings since their choice of libraries (JUnit, jMock, and something called Window Licker I had never heard of) seem to have fallen out of favor. Instead, focus on the listings where they show all of the steps and how their code evolved through building out each individual item. It’s sort of as if you are engaged in pair programming with the book, in that you see the thought process and those intermediate steps that would never show up in a commit history, sort of like this old post on refactoring but with the code intermixed.

This would have been mind blowing stuff to me in 2010, however the march of time seems to have moved three of the five parts of the book into ‘correct but commonly known’ territory. The last two parts cover what people are still having trouble with when doing TDD.

Part 4 of the book really spoke to me. It is an anti-pattern listing describing ways they had seen TDD go off the rails and options for how to try to deal with each of those issues. Some of the anti-patterns were architectural like singletons, some were specific technical ideas like patterns for making test data, and some were more social in terms of how to write the tests to make the more readable or create better failure messages.

Part 5 covers some advanced topics like how to write tests for threads or asynchronous code. I haven’t had a chance to try the strategies they are showing but they do look better than the ways I had coped with these problems in the past. There is also an awesome appendix on how to write a hamcrest matcher which when I’ve had to do it in the past was more difficult to to do the first time than it would look.

Overall if you are doing TDD and are running into issues, checking out part 4 of this book could easily help you immediately. Reading parts 1 through 3 is still a great introduction to the topic if you aren’t already familiar. I didn’t have a good recommendation book on TDD before and while this isn’t amazing in all respects I would recommend it to someone looking to get started with the ideas.

Book Chat: AWS in Action

Amazon Web Services in Action is a great introduction to the basics of AWS. It mostly discusses IaaS services, but touches on some of the PaaS services too. It also covers a good portion of what’s in the Architecting on AWS course if you were considering that. I was hoping for coverage of AWS Lambda, API Gateway and EC2 Container Service but they weren’t included. There were references to when to use AWS Cloudfront but it was never introduced like the other services were.

It’s a very quick read, even though it weighs in about 400 pages. There are lots of detailed examples including specific information about if the example was covered under the free tier of services and how to be sure to roll back everything. Lots of screenshots of consoles and the CLI interface and plenty of code samples of using the various SDKs, mostly in node.

If you are already familiar with AWS this probably isn’t the right book for you. It doesn’t cover the architecture aspect in depth, just simple examples of how to combine the various services. For my taste it doesn’t sufficiently cover how to decide when to use a PaaS solution vs rolling your own at the IaaS level. There is one little chart in the portion covering Elastic Beanstalk about the benefits of it vs other less managed options.

Overall it wasn’t the book I was looking for. But it is the sort of thing that can be helpful to lots of people who want to try and understand how to apply their existing architectural knowledge to the AWS platform.

Book Chat: Zero Bugs and Program Faster

Zero Bugs and Program Faster by Kate Thompson is a book that’s hard to describe. None of it is a really novel way of looking at creating software but it’s all of those things that you would expect to describe when you think about how to do programming well. It’s a breezy and fun read that is divided into enough small sections that you can read it in however much time you have available.

The book is structured in two parts. The first part is a series of short vignettes about programming. Some of which are more direct, like the chapter on ACID; some are more abstract, like the chapter entitled “The Many Sides of the Elephant.” I appreciated the dual chapters of “Do It Now” and “Do It Later” that are about how you can’t always do it now but you shouldn’t always defer it either. None of it was a mind shattering revelation but it was all solid advice about programming.

The second part is extracts from various programs to demonstrate a lot of different ideas. The code samples in the second part were generally significantly older, mostly in assembly or C. The low level nature of the examples made it more difficult for me to appreciate. Seeing Altair assembly from the 70s that’s notable for being clever and concise won’t help me build a better web service today.

If you are the sort of person who is reading lots of programming books, you will appreciate the book, however you may not get much from it. If you aren’t the kind of person who reads lots of programming books some of the more oblique points may be obscured. I don’t have anything bad to say about it but don’t know who I would recommend the book to.

Book Chat: Daring Greatly

This is a bit outside of the normal material I write about here, but I felt that it was something that others might appreciate as well. One of my wife’s classmates gave her a copy of Daring Greatly and said that it was part of his inspiration to be in their doctoral program. I’ve always read broadly and tried to find a way to integrate that into my life. I saw this book and wasn’t sure if it was the sort of thing for me, but I decided to read it to find out. I started reading it and maybe a third of the way through I thought to myself, “I’ve read this book before but with the word vulnerability replaced with with word authenticity.” But I kept reading and eventually something started resonating with me.

What resonated was the idea that you need to put yourself out there, give more of yourself to the situation, and say those things you are thinking. You have to do that even if it’s not be easy, because it is important and is part of what separates good from great. The willingness to say something that puts yourself in a vulnerable position to open yourself to those around you takes a bigger commitment than most people are willing to make. People are willing to say the easy thing but not the hard things that require them to push against the structure around them. It’s like the Emperor’s New Clothes, everyone sees something but the incentive structure is put together so they don’t recognize the problem. This book is all about how to structure your own thoughts to be able to push against the structure around you.

There are portions of the book written in an abstract sense and some others that are much more specific. The specific sections contain several manifestos to describe how leaders or parents should behave around those they are responsible for. It puts out there that you may not be perfect but that you strive to be better and hope that everyone else engages with you in trying to be better. Each of the manifestos describes how the person in that situation can open up to those subordinate to them to truly embrace the position they are in.

I’m not sure if this is that profound, or if it found me at the point in my life that had me open to what it was saying. However I felt moved by this. It made me feel that I should push outwards and express my opinions further. I had been expressing myself in some domains, however it is hard to put yourself out there in all areas all of the time. Sometimes you just want to wait and let things happen, but sometimes you need to make things happen. Not in the doing sense but in the living sense, where you can’t just wait for something to happen but need something to progress the situation.